6 Diseases Your Lack of Sleep Could Be Causing

Sleep deprivation can lead to higher risk of chronic health problems like high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke. According to Harvard Medical School, for people with hypertension, one night without enough sleep can cause elevated blood pressure all through the next day.

Sleep deprivation was a factor in some of the biggest disasters in recent history: the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, the massive Exxon Valdez oil spill, the 1986 nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl, and others.

But sleep loss is also a big public safety hazard every day on the road.

These are the 6 diseases which are caused by the lack of sleep:

  1. Cardiovascular Disease

Lack of sleep can increase insulin resistance, a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Shortened sleep can increase CRP, or C-reactive protein, which is released with stress and inflammation. “If your CRP is high, it’s a risk factor for cardiovascular and heart disease.

Sleep is essential for a healthy heart. People who don’t sleep enough are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease—regardless of age, weight, smoking and exercise habits. One study that examined data from 3,000 adults over the age of 45 found that those who slept fewer than six hours per night were about twice as likely to have a stroke or heart attack as people who slept six to eight hours per night.

  1. Ulcerative colitis

When you experience an ulcerative colitis flare, it’s easy to assign blame, be it on last night’s spicy dinner or on that extra-large coffee. In actuality, flares are unpredictable — there are no proven triggers or foolproof ways to prevent them.

However, when you’re experiencing active ulcerative colitis symptoms, certain bad habits canmake you feel worse or keep you from reaching remission. Avoiding these common mistakes is an important part of ulcerative colitis management.

“Fatigue is not a universal symptom of ulcerative colitis, but it’s a common one,” says William Katkov, MD, a gastroenterologist at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, California. “The important point is that fatigue should be addressed by both the patient and the treating physician.

If you’re living with ulcerative colitis and you’re experiencing fatigue, it may feel as if you’ll never get your energy back. But by tightening  control of your condition and making some healthy lifestyle changes, you can manage your fatigue. Start here.

  1. Obesity and Diabetes

A growing body of research suggests that there’s a link between how much people sleep and how much they weigh. In general, children and adults who get too little sleep tend to weigh more than those who get enough sleep.

For example, in the Nurses’ Health Study, researchers followed roughly 60,000 women for 16 years, asking them about their weight, sleep habits, diet, and other aspects of their lifestyle.

At the start of the study, all of the women were healthy, and none were obese; 16 years later,women who slept 5 hours or less per night had a 15 percent higher risk of becoming obese, compared to women who slept 7 hours per night. Short sleepers also had 30 percent higher risk of gaining 30 pounds over the course of the study, compared to women who got 7 hours of sleep per night.

According to Mahowald, the body’s reaction to sleep loss can resemble insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. Insulin’s job is to help the body use glucose for energy. In insulin resistance, cells fail to use the hormone efficiently, resulting in high blood sugar.

  1. Alzheimer’s

Those studies showed a link in mice between sleep loss and brain plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Early evidence tentatively suggests the connection may work in both directions: Alzheimer’s plaques disrupt sleep, and lack of sleeppromotes Alzheimer’s plaques.

Sleep is disrupted in people who likely have early Alzheimer’s disease but do not yet have the memory loss or other cognitive problems characteristic of full-blown disease, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report March 11 in JAMA Neurology .

The finding confirms earlier observations by some of the same researchers. Those studies showed a link in mice between sleep loss and brain plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Early evidence tentatively suggests the connection may work in both directions: Alzheimer’s plaques disrupt sleep, and lack of sleep promotes Alzheimer’s plaques.

  1. Prostate Cancer

 Affecting more men than any other cancer, an estimated 233,000 new cases of prostate cancer are expected in 2014. Last year, a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Preventionfound that men who suffer from insomnia may be at increased risk of prostate cancer.

Researchers surveyed of 2,102 men and followed the 1,347 men in the group who didn’t fall asleep easily and/or experienced disrupted sleep.

After about five years, 135 men developed prostate cancer, with 26 of them having an aggressive form of the disease.

  1. Suicide

Clinical depression is a mood disorder. It causes you to feel sad, hopeless, worthless, and helpless. Sure, we all feel sad or blue from time to time. But when you feel sad for long periods and the feelings become intense, the depressed mood and its associated physical symptoms can keep you from living a normal life.

Insomnia is a known risk factor for people killing themselves. Not being able to enjoy restful sleep combines with insomnia to cause a deviating pattern of thoughts concerning poor sleep ability that link to suicidal thoughts.

 Some people unable to obtain a sufficient amount of sleep became obsessed with the notion that a night of restful, restorative sleep was no longer within their grasp.

Sources:
www.medicaldaily.com
www.healthyfoodplans.net
healthytipsworld.com

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