IMPORTANT: List Of 16 Foods To Eat And Avoid On An Empty Stomach!

Yogurt, a cup of coffee, and fresh orange juice — this is what most people probably picture when they think of a perfect breakfast. Unfortunately, only a few people are aware that some foods are not very good for us if eaten on an empty stomach.

As anyone who has ever made fresh juice knows, it takes several pounds of produce to produce 16 ounces of juice. And that’s part of what makes juicing seem like such a healthy habit.  We all know that fruits and vegetables are good for us.

OATMEAL
They’re a gluten-free whole grain and a great source of important vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. Studies show that oats and oatmeal have many health benefits. These include weight loss, lower blood sugar levels and a reduced risk of heart disease.

TOMATOES
Tomatoes are also an excellent source vitamin C, biotin, molybdenum and vitamin K. They are also a very good source of copper, potassium, manganese, dietary fiber, vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene), vitamin B6, folate, niacin, vitamin E and phosphorus.

EGGS
Eggs are a very good source of inexpensive, high quality protein. More than half the protein of an egg is found in the egg white along with vitamin B2 and lower amounts of fat and cholesterol than the yolk. The whites are rich sources of selenium, vitamin D, B6, B12 and minerals such as zinc, iron and copper.

BLUEBERRIES
 The blueberry’s fiber, potassium, folate, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and phytonutrient content, coupled with its lack of cholesterol, all support heart health. The fiber in blueberries helps lower the total amount of cholesterol in the blood and decrease the risk of heart disease.

WATERMELON
Watermelons are mostly water — about 92 percent — but this refreshing fruit is soaked with nutrients. Each juicy bite has significant levels of vitamins A, B6 and C, lots of lycopene, antioxidants and amino acids. There’s even a modest amount of potassium.

COFFEE OR TEA
Health Benefits of Coffee, Based on Science. It is loaded with antioxidants and beneficial nutrients that can improve your health. The studies show that coffeedrinkers have a much lower risk of several serious diseases.

NUTS
Raw macadamia nuts also contain high amounts of vitamin B1, magnesium, and manganese. Moreover, about 60 percent of the fatty acid in macadamia is the monounsaturated fat oleic acid. This is about the level found in olives, which are well known for their health benefits.

CITRUS FRUITS
A 2011 study from Western University in London, Ont., shows that nobiletin, a flavonoid that is extracted from tangerines, helps to prevent obesity and offers protection against type 2 diabetes.

PAPAYA
Papaya in raw form contains this enzyme, which is used in the preparation of dietary supplements and chewing gums. Papaya is rich in antioxidant nutrients such as carotenes, flavonoids and vitamin C, as well as vitamin B (folate and pantothenic acid). It is also a good source of fiber and minerals such as magnesium.

SHORT CRUST/PUFF PASTRY
Bread is probably the bakery product we eat the most, which means that, while it might not be the saltiest food you can think of, it can make a significant contribution to the salt content of our diet.

BUCKWHEAT
While many people think that buckwheat is a cereal grain, it is actually a fruit seed that is related to rhubarb and sorrel making it a suitable substitute for grains for people who are sensitive to wheat or other grains that contain protein glutens.

WHEAT GERM
It’s an excellent source of vegetable proteins, along with fiber and healthy fats. It’s also a good source of magnesium, zinc, thiamin, folate, potassium, and phosphorus. Wheat germ is also high in vitamin E, an essential nutrient with antioxidantproperties.

CARBONATED DRINKS
Carbonated water contains carbon dioxide gas, which makes the liquid bubbly and fizzy. Carbonated water is generally as healthy as regular water. Soda, also known as pop, is a sugary, carbonated soft drink. Soda has more health dangers than pluses; however, it can provide some benefits.

CORNMEAL PORRIDGE
Unlike flour made from wheat grains, corn meal does not contain gluten, so it makes for a safe cooking ingredient for those suffering from celiac disease or gluten intolerance, according to Colorado State University.

WHOLE GRAINS (NO YEAST)
Whole grains are packed with nutrients, including protein, fiber, B vitamins, antioxidants, and trace minerals (iron, zinc, copper, and magnesium). A diet rich in whole grains has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and some forms of cancer.

Source: besthealthyguide.com
Other Sources Included:
cambridge.org
cabdirect.org
thejns.org
ajcn.nutrition.org
cabdirect.org

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